Komatsuna Print Tenugui

¥2,490

A tenugui is an thin, rectangular cloth that’s been part of Japanese bathing culture for centuries.

This exfoliating facial cloth features a whimsical botanical print inspired by our native superfood, komatsuna. Komatsuna print designed by Ace Rivera.

Hand dyed by Murai Senkoujo, Tokyo’s sole remaining specialty manufacturer of tenugui operating in Edogawa, Japan since 1936.

100% cotton and measures approximately 90 cm x 35 cm.

In stock

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Description

This whimsical komatsuna print tenugui depicts komatsuna, the leafy green Japanese superfood and star ingredient of [EDO BEAUTY LAB].  Our original komatsuna print tenugui are made in Edogawa, Japan at Murai Senkoujo using traditional Chusen stencil method. The artwork is designed exclusively for [EDO BEAUTY LAB] by urban artist Ace Rivera.

Tenugui are traditional Japanese towels that act as a gentle, non-abrasive exfoliating treatment. Its natural fibers are effective in removing makeup and other impurities that accumulate on your face.

These highly-absorbent cloths have unhemmed edges, which allow for faster drying times. This reduces the buildup of bacteria resulting in a cleaner, longer-lasting face towel.

When you can no longer use your tenugui as a face towel, simply repurpose it! Try using it as a tapestry or a fashion item that adds a touch of Japan to your daily living. See our blog post, 10 Ways To Use Your Tenugui, for ideas!

[EDO BEAUTY LAB], Green Beauty From Edogawa, Japan

At [EDO BEAUTY LAB], it is our desire to share the wonders of “green beauty” and the natural beauty of Edogawa, Japan through our komatsuna skincare products and handcrafted tools. Our products are handmade in Edogawa, Japan, which enables [EDO BEAUTY LAB] to make Sustainable Development Goals work for our community.

About Ace

Ace Rivera is an urban artist, living in West Tokyo since 2015. Originally an English teacher working for the JET program, he started a daily drawing journal in 2019 with a small sketchbook and 12 colored pencils. It was a creative way to relieve stress and document the daily ups and downs of living in Japan as a person of color.

Shortly after completing his five year tenure on the JET program in 2020, Ace’s artistic skills expanded into doing watercolor and digital art as a full time artist. He now sells commissioned art while still sharing his journey artistically on his social media page every day.

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